April 22, 2014
hitchhikersguidetothegalaxy:

the-wayward-demon:

Sounds like something that belongs in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

I really want one that says “mostly harmless.”

What about trees, whales, tortoises…?

hitchhikersguidetothegalaxy:

the-wayward-demon:

Sounds like something that belongs in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

I really want one that says “mostly harmless.”

What about trees, whales, tortoises…?

(via notyourstereotypicallibrarian)

April 22, 2014

My son Peter and I took in our first Red Sox game of the season on April 7th versus the Texas Rangers. While the 2013 champions have struggled early on, we were treated to a thrilling 5-1 victory. Yes, it was April baseball, as both teams had a passed ball and an error, and probably deserved some more errors. But a win’s a win. As an extra bonus, we received a David Ortiz bobblehead upon entering. And since Peter is now a member of Kid Nation, we were allowed to enter the ballpark early and watch the Red Sox batting practice from the Green Monster seats, which was pretty awesome.

Photopost: Red Sox at Fenway Park My son Peter and I took in our first Red Sox game of the season on April 7th versus the Texas Rangers.

April 22, 2014

Fifteen years ago, I attended the Boston Marathon for the first time.  I knew about the race from an early age, because even in southwestern Connecticut where I grew up it is a big enough event to warrant lots of news coverage.  I also knew enough to be envious of Massachusetts’ schoolchildren that they got an extra holiday that fell on a lovely spring Monday.  But in 1998, I was skeptical that watching people run could be all that entertaining.

Still, I gave it a chance and rode my bike to Cleveland Circle to take in the race.  There was a thrill to seeing all the motorcycles, the press van, the time clock, and finally the small of elite runners zip by.  But what happened next it was really surprised me.  The ordinary runners, the people running to raise money for charities, or to prove something to themselves, or just because they love running began to arrive on the course, first in a trickle then in a big pack.  And the crowds of spectators grew and became louder and they cheered on EVERY. SINGLE. RUNNER.  I walked along the course, following the runners all the way down Beacon Street to Kenmore Square and then on to Boylston Street to the finish line.  Then I rode the green line back to Cleveland Circle along with proud finishers wearing mylar blankets, feeling like I was surrounded by large baked potatoes.

Boston is a town known for its reserve, something that to outsiders may appear aloof or rude.  But on this day, Patriots Day, there’s a near Bacchinalian explosion of good feeling as every spectator expresses their love and support of other people, the majority of whom are complete strangers.  I read stories of experience marathon runners who describe Boston as unlike any other race as the entire course tends to be lined with people offering constant support.  In fact, these runners say that they can’t even leave the race, because the spectators push them back onto the course, which is borderline aggressive, but done with the best intentions.

Last year, this celebration of the best of Boston humanity was marred by the two explosions near the finish line that killed three spectators and wounded hundreds more.  And yet, that Boston spirit was still there as people – both medical professionals and amateurs – rushed to the injured.  There quick action and selflessness save many lives and has been encapsulated in the idea of Boston Strong.  In the wake of the bombings, Bostonians were frightened and saddened, yet also calm and determined.  People I know from far away seemed more freaked out, wondering if anyone would want to run the marathon in the future, perhaps even canceling it entire.  President Obama got it right when he said “Next year, on the third Monday in April, the world will return to this great American city to run harder than ever, and to cheer even louder, for the 118th Boston Marathon. Bet on it.”

Since that first marathon in 1998, I’ve tried to watch it every year when I can get off work.  Last year, I did have the day off from work but was unable to convince my children that they would want to go watch people run and cheer for them.  We went to the playground instead.  In retrospect, ambulance that passed us by at incredible speeds as we were on our way to the playground were certainly responding to the bombings. I learned of the bombings from checking my smartphone while watching my children play.

I knew that I would have to watch the 2014 marathon no matter what. Luckily, the kids were agreeable, and my whole  family watched the marathon today.  We returned to my favorite spot at Cleveland Circle.  Conveniently, there is a playground tucked behind the buildings on Beacon Street, so the kids could take a break.  My daughter Kay peeked through the fence and shook some noisemakers while cheering on the runners.  My son Peter was more intent on watching the race and spotting some friends of ours among the pack.  He gave high five to runners and one woman stopped and talked to him about her stomach cramps. It was a gorgeous day, a great marathon, and really everything that Patriots Day in Boston is supposed to be.

Related Posts:

Boston Marathon 2014 Fifteen years ago, I attended the Boston Marathon for the first time.  I knew about the race from an early age, because even in southwestern Connecticut where I grew up it is a big enough event to warrant lots of news coverage.  

April 21, 2014
It was a great Marathon Day today in Massachusetts.

 (via The Boston Marathon, 2014 - Photos - The Big Picture - Boston.com)

It was a great Marathon Day today in Massachusetts.

(via The Boston Marathon, 2014 - Photos - The Big Picture - Boston.com)

April 20, 2014
vertrauensie-dervalkyrja:

pwned.

vertrauensie-dervalkyrja:

pwned.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

April 20, 2014
"

If the downward trend continues — and if anything it seems to be accelerating — we’re just a few years from the point at which electricity from solar panels becomes cheaper than electricity generated by burning coal.

And if we priced coal-fired power right, taking into account the huge health and other costs it imposes, it’s likely that we would already have passed that tipping point.

"

Here Comes Solar Energy - NYTimes.com (via greenpeace)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

April 20, 2014
reveverett:

So this is what happens when a #Bruins game gets out at the same time as I’m walking to #Church. #Easter!  (at TD Garden)

reveverett:

So this is what happens when a #Bruins game gets out at the same time as I’m walking to #Church. #Easter! (at TD Garden)

April 20, 2014

l-lound:

mantra: don’t say anything to yourself that Bob Ross wouldn’t say to you

image

(via bobrossgifs)

April 20, 2014

creatingaquietmind:

This is my life

(Source: delusioninabox, via teachingliteracy)

April 20, 2014
"

Do not teach your daughters to be ‘pretty.’

Do not entomb her in a pretty pink tower
and insist that only the degree of her physical appeal
may set her free.
Teach her to fight her way out,
to consume books and spit knowledge
to lesser boys who insist she is just beautiful
and nothing more.

Teach her to love her body
not to manipulate and put a price tag on herself
as a defined worth
she shall be immeasurable
she shall be more than this.

Do not let her break herself down
when the boy in kindergarden hits her
because he likes her.
What are you really teaching her?
Pain and love are not synonymous
neither are pretty and perfection.

Teach her to be kind
to be harsh
to be demure
to be wild
to be sensitive
to be thick-skinned

But good god,

Do not teach your daughters to be ‘pretty.’

"

Michelle K., Do Not Teach Your Daughters to Be ‘Pretty’ (via creatingaquietmind)

(via teachingliteracy)

April 20, 2014
liberalsarecool:

Conservative business school.

liberalsarecool:

Conservative business school.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

April 20, 2014
nevver:

Roll away the stone

nevver:

Roll away the stone

(Source: Los Angeles Times, via thelifeguardlibrarian)

April 19, 2014
(via xkcd: Free Speech)

(via xkcd: Free Speech)

April 19, 2014
Song of the Week: “Dream the Dare” by Pure Bathing Culture

Song of the Week: “Dream the Dare” by Pure Bathing Culture

This week’s song is not very current, it’s from last year.  But Pure Bathing Culture‘s “Dream the Dare” is very pretty and I was reacquainted with the song through The Best of RISK! Music Podcast.  There’s something about the echoey quality in the vocals and harmonies that reminds me of a song from the 80s (or maybe the late 70s), but I can’t recall what song it is.  If you have any suggestions,…

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April 19, 2014

The Midnight Ride of William Dawes
by Helen F. Moore 
I am a wandering, bitter shade,Never of me was a hero made;Poets have never sung my praise,Nobody crowned my brow with bays;And if you ask me the fatal cause,I answer only, “My name was Dawes”'Tis all very well for the children to hearOf the midnight ride of Paul Revere;But why should my name be quite forgot,Who rode as boldly and well, God wot?Why should I ask? The reason is clear —My name was Dawes and his Revere.When the lights from the old North Church flashed out,Paul Revere was waiting about,But I was already on my way.The shadows of night fell cold and grayAs I rode, with never a break or a pause;But what was the use, when my name was Dawes!History rings with his silvery name;Closed to me are the portals of fame.Had he been Dawes and I Revere,No one had heard of him, I fear.No one has heard of me becauseHe was Revere and I was Dawes.

The Midnight Ride of William Dawes
by Helen F. Moore 

I am a wandering, bitter shade,
Never of me was a hero made;
Poets have never sung my praise,
Nobody crowned my brow with bays;
And if you ask me the fatal cause,
I answer only, “My name was Dawes”

'Tis all very well for the children to hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere;
But why should my name be quite forgot,
Who rode as boldly and well, God wot?
Why should I ask? The reason is clear —
My name was Dawes and his Revere.

When the lights from the old North Church flashed out,
Paul Revere was waiting about,
But I was already on my way.
The shadows of night fell cold and gray
As I rode, with never a break or a pause;
But what was the use, when my name was Dawes!

History rings with his silvery name;
Closed to me are the portals of fame.
Had he been Dawes and I Revere,
No one had heard of him, I fear.
No one has heard of me because
He was Revere and I was Dawes.

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